A Walk in the Garden

High Beeches Garden has just reopened after the winter, and we went for a walk round the garden to see what is in flower.  I am very good at mainly noticing Camellias 🌺 and Magnolias 🌸, somehow I always get drawn to them.  However, if you look past the flourishes of Camellia flowers there are rather a lot of other fun things to be found, in all sorts of colours.The Rhododendrons 🌺🌺are starting to flower and there are some magnificent ones - I always find it amazing the difference in size between these trees, there are absolutely tiny ones such as the Rhododendron racemosum, sitting right next to Rhododendron macabeanum, whose flowers I always think looks more like an animal than vegetable.I was particularly taken with the white star shaped flower on the Rhododendron quinquefolium ⭐️ and also the Grevillea 'Canberra Gem', which looks so pretty in flower, and seems so unexpected, the contrast of dark green and bright red ❤️💚.The cherry blossom 🌸🍒 is starting to appear and we found Prunus Sargentii, an excellent purply pink, and also the Montezuma Pine (such a good name) has cones on it 🌲😍.There is so much to see, and this is only the beginning - it will be in full bloom before too long 😊.If you want to read more about the garden in detail - the blog, written by Sarah Bray, has all sorts of details about the garden and the plants - High Beeches Garden blog.Alice xxxIMG_4715IMG_4735IMG_4645IMG_4627IMG_4658IMG_4701IMG_4709IMG_4697IMG_4718IMG_4726IMG_4738IMG_4686IMG_4746 

February Flowers - The Plant Lesson

It was rather grey and cold  ❄️❄️☔️ today (I still am not enjoying the cold weather) but Pip 🐶 and I decided to venture out.February is a good time of year as, although it feels like the cold may never go away and it is dark and dreary and freezing, the flowers are beginning to appear 🌱🌸🌺🌼.I find it very reassuring that every year, despite the cold❄️, the trees 🌳 and plants 🌱 begin to flower 🌼, it is definitely the best sign that spring is on it's way - a dash of bright colour 🌻 amongst all the dark greens and browns.So Pip 🐶 and I went to investigate, and found much to look at.Daffodils 🌼are out in force, despite the cold, and we found some lovely little Narcissus cyclamineus with their heads bowed down.  I always think these little daffodils look a bit like tiny horses 🐎 with their ears back, suspiciously investigating something on the ground - they are rather sweet!  The narcissus bulbocodium are also dotted about, their little trumpet-like 📣 petals are always so delightful - they are definitely more bossy than the cyclamineus.There are crocuses (or croci) 🌷 just starting to open their petals - I love the lilac and orange combination, they are very non-fussed flowers, they just flower where and when they feel like it, without too much worry of what anyone might think - Pip and I came across a solo crocus growing in the middle of the path..The magnolias 💐 are still tentative, they haven't opened their furry buds up to the cold yet, I always think the many huge buds make them look like some prehistoric creature lying in wait 🐉.The faithful snowdrops 🌾are sprouting up everywhere, I love their plant name 'galanthus' from the Greek gála 'milk' 🍶 and ánthos 'flower' 🌼, it sounds rather like a character from Game of Thrones 🐲.We found a very brave cherry 🍒 , Prunus okame, which is a really warm pink against the cold greens.  I love 💕💞💘 cherry 🍒blossom 🌸 a very large amount.AND most excitingly, the Camellias 🌺 are emerging, and we came across many bright pinks 🌺 and pale pinks 🌸.I really like Camellias 🌺, they are one of my favourite flowers, I prefer the ones without the bright yellow stamens.  We came across a lovely Camellia japonica 'Australis' - a very good pink indeed, magenta, with beautifully arranged petals, I also love how the just emerging buds 🌷 look, so fairy tale esque.Camellias 🌺are part of the Theaceae family and they originate from the Eastern Himalayas, Japan and Malaysia - they are happiest growing by streams 🌊 or on rocky hillsides 🗻.  They have been cultivated in China and Japan for over 1000 years (a very long time) and were first cultivated for the oil 🏮 from their seeds, then for tea ☕️ (you can actually buy tea made from English Camellias at Tregothnan- made from Camellia sinensis - they sell it is Fortnums too, if your after some in a hurry) And then just because they are pretty to look at. There are around 200 species of them and they were named after the Jesuit ⛪️ botanist 🌿 Georg Joseph Kamel.  The petals 🌺 of the flowers are exquisitely arranged and the trees 🌿have wonderful dark green leathery leaves.  They are really very splendid.We had a quick plant lesson ✏️📚 over supper, so now everything is a little clearer...Alice xxAlso I'm now on Blog Lovin' 😊 - you can follow me here  👍IMG_2745IMG_2698IMG_2705IMG_2711IMG_2743IMG_2763IMG_2718IMG_2728IMG_2734IMG_2742IMG_2802IMG_2801